Annotated Bibliography “Annotate: to make or furnish critical or explanatory not

Annotated Bibliography
“Annotate: to make or furnish critical or explanatory notes or comment”
(Merriam-Webster)
An annotated bibliography is a list of citations of books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 125 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited. Creating an annotated bibliography will require you to apply a variety of skills: conciseness, succinct analysis, and thorough and informed library research.
Your annotated bibliography will be written in paragraph form and will be an informative synthesis of the article or chapter upon reflection. It should include the following:
RESEARCH TOPIC: Pick a topic related to your current (or potential) area of interest or career within the social work field (Refer to Chapter 8 of the Textbook for ideas).
Introduction and Summary of Bibliography Citations: This should be a 1 page introduction that presents the context of the bibliography (e.g. what areas of research were examined and how does it inform our understanding of your research interests.
Use a minimum of 4 current research articles/chapters from respected and scholarly journals/books (e.g. Educational Administration Quarterly, Review of Higher Education, Journal of Educational Leadership, etc.). This means that you need to complete a minimum of 4 summaries for this paper.
Full citation of the source (APA 6th Edition). Paragraph form- write a full coherent paragraph (see examples)
An informative synthesis.
Tell the reader:
what the main findings or arguments are in the source and then;
in two or three sentences summarize or describe the content and
in one or two sentences provide an evaluation of the source.
This assignment requires the following format:
Part 1: Introduction and Summary of Bibliography Citations: This should be a 1 pageintroduction that presents the context of the bibliography (e.g. what areas of research were examined and how does it inform our understanding of your research interests.
Part 2: An informative synthesis of each article reviewed. For each article, write:
1) Two or three sentences identifying what the main findings or arguments are in the article.
2) Two or three sentences summarizing or describing the content.
3) One or two sentences providing an evaluation of the source. (Ex. What did you think of the article? Do you agree with the author(s) conclusions?)
Part 3: Screen shot of source. A copy of the title page of the article and abstract and/or chapter title should be included with the critique.

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