Final Exam Subject: With the definitions cited below in mind, in an essay of at

Final Exam Subject: With the definitions cited below in mind, in an essay of at least 600 words (around 300 words for each) describe the impact of its ATMOSPHERE and/or SETTING in:
Aphra Behn, Oroonoko, or The Royal Slave. Norton Anthology of World Literature, 4th Edition Shorter, Vol. 2: pp. 192-242,
and in one of these two readings:
Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness. Norton Anthology of World Literature, 4th Edition Shorter, Vol. 2 pp. 898-959.
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart. Not in our edition of Norton. Use any edition, or pdf.
Also do quote from each reading a passage of about 50 words in support of your ideas, as well as using and underlining 5 literary terms from the list below (a total of 5, not 5 for eachreading), to express them.
“Atmosphere: The prevailing tone or mood of a literary work, particularly—but not exclusively—when that mood is established in part by setting or landscape. It is, however, not simply setting but rather the emotional aura which the work bears and which establishes the reader’s expectations and attitudes.”
— Hibbard, Addison & William Flint Thrall, A Handbook to Literature. Rev. and enlarged by C. Hugh Holman. New York: Odyssey Press, 1960.
“Atmosphere is the mood pervading a literary work, setting up in the reader expectations as to the course of events, whether happy or (more commonly) disastrous.”
–Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 1stedition. New York: Holt Rhinehart, 1957.
Setting: The physical and cultural background against which the action of a narrative (epic, dramatic, fictional) takes place. The elements which go to make up a setting are: (1) the actual geographical location, its topography [mountains, seacoast etc.], scenery…; (2) the occupations and daily manner of living of the characters; (3) the time or period in which the action takes place, e.g., epoch in history, season of the year etc. (4) the general environment of the characters, e.g. religious [including mythical, when Gods were seen as mixing in the affairs of people], mental, moral, social and emotional conditions through with the people in the narrative move.
–Based on: Hibbard, Addison & William Flint Thrall, A Handbook to Literature. Rev. and enlarged C. Hugh Holman. New York: Odyssey Press, 1960.
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Literary Terms: Use and Underline a total of 5
I. Figurative Language and Basic Literary Terms
1. Allegory
2. Allusion
3. Ambiguity
4. Atmosphere
5. Deus ex machina
6. Epic
7. Epiphany
8. Genre
9. Imagery
10. Irony
11. kleos, kudos (Greek: glory, honor, fame)
12. Metaphor
13. Metis (Greek: cunning, deceit, disguise)
14. Paradox
15. Pathos
16. Satire
17. Personification
18. Simile
19. Symbol
20. Synecdoche
21. Utopia/Dystopia
II. Elements of Fiction
1. Character(ization)
2. Conflict
3. Narrative point of view (first person, second person, third person, third person omniscient, or unreliable narrator)
4. Novel
5. Plot/subplot (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement)
6. Protagonist/Antagonist
7. Setting
8. Short Story
9. Theme
III. Historical Periods and Literary Movements
1. Classical
2. Enlightenment
3. Medieval
4. Modernism
5. Naturalism
6. Realism
7. Renaissance
8. Romanticism
III. Elements of Poetry
1. Meter ( heroic couplet; blank verse & iambic pentameter)
2. Pastoral
3. Rhyme Scheme
4. Sonnet (Petrarchan and Shakespearian)
IV. Elements of Drama and Epic
1. Chorus
2. Comedy
3. Hybris (Greek: Pride)
4. Invocation
5. Recognition/Anagnorisis
6. Reversal/Peripeteia
7. Soliloquy
8. Tragedy

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